Real Kids. Good Books.

Ask away   Blog Recommendations   All Time Favorites   

Our children are gorgeously diverse and they love a good read. At the heart of Real Kids/ Good Books are authors and illustrators who are building a new diverse canon, book by dazzling book.

Themes include: children of color, LGBTQ, adoption, special needs, math, science and writing. And of course there is also a mishmash of miscellany and reblogged tidbits that strike my fancy as they float by.

Thanks for stopping by.
-Kate

"The language of complaint usually tells us, and others, what it is we can’t stand. The language of commitment tells us (and possibly others) what it is we stand for."
Kegan and Lahey
— 21 minutes ago
"Schools are a major part of society’s institutional processes for maintaining a relatively stable system of inequality. They contribute to these results by active acceptance and utilization of a dominant set of values, norms and beliefs, which, while appearing to offer opportunities to all, actually support the success of a privileged minority and hinder the efforts and visions of a majority."
Eugene Eubanks, Ralph Parish, and Dianne Smith
— 23 minutes ago with 3 notes
The Diversity in Kids Lit Motherlode!

I came across this A-MAZE-ING list of books featuring kids of color today. If you want to read stories about kids of color — especially those where race isn’t the driving force behind the story— then there is something here for you. 

Thanks shelftalker (a.k.a. Elizabeth Bluemle)! 

A World Full of Color database

— 2 days ago with 4 notes
Latinas in STEM →

(Source: robtrujilloart)

— 3 days ago with 3 notes
"I’m a writer, artist and a youth services outreach librarian. I wrote Lowriders in Space because as an Arab American, I was fed up with the inability of mainstream comics and books to represent the diversity of kids I see everyday, kids who like me, don’t see themselves in books. When I first sent the script to the book’s artist, Raúl III, who is Latino, he told me, “This is the book I wanted to read as a child,” and he was as excited as I was to create it, and for the same reasons. Our editor at Chronicle Books, Ginee Seo, is Korean American, and she gets it too—like us she wants to give kids a book that meets them where they are. I’d been working on the book since 2006, and was thrilled when the #WeNeedDiverseBooks campaign launched in May 2014. We’re hoping that when Lowriders comes out this fall, it kicks a big hole in the wall of racism of kids’ books, welcoming kids of all backgrounds to read it. We hope it encourages publishers to create more books by new authors and illustrators of color, and to inspire kids via reading our book, to become creators, too."
— 4 days ago with 3 notes
"Jackson Katz, a scholar and activist who has created effective anti-violence programs focused on changing male behavior, has studied how media images of white men in particular consistently link masculinity with the use of force. As he put it in “Gender, Race and Class in Media,” in an era of loosening gender norms, one of the ways media create and maintain gender difference is to “equate masculinity with violence, power and control (and femininity with passivity).” Goff’s work has shown that masculinity factors into police violence as well. “An officer who feels a need to demonstrate his masculinity may be more likely to use force in general, but particularly against people who threaten his self-concept as a man,” he said. “If African-Americans are seen as hypermasculine, then the officer will feel more threatened. ” This can be true whether or not the officer exhibits clear racial bias. In studying the San Jose Police Department, the CPE found that in addition to explicit and implicit bias, “concerns about one’s self-image — specifically concerns with one’s masculine self-image and one’s image as a nonracist — predicted racial disparities in police use of force.”"
— 1 week ago
Good Books/ Great Quotes

The next morning as we are preparing to leave, Tante Ilyana presents me with a three-pound sack of coffee beans to bring to my father in Brooklyn. 
"When he has a taste of this coffee," she says, "it will bring him home."
I marvel at the magic of this coffee of which Tante Ilyana is so certain. What if such a thing did exist, an elixir against fading memoires, a panacea to evoke images of spaces lost to us, to instantly return us home. 

-Edwidge Danticat, Create Dangerously: The Immigrant Artist at Work (2010). 
(Image source: The Rumpus Interview with Edwidge Danticat)

Good Books/ Great Quotes

The next morning as we are preparing to leave, Tante Ilyana presents me with a three-pound sack of coffee beans to bring to my father in Brooklyn. 

"When he has a taste of this coffee," she says, "it will bring him home."

I marvel at the magic of this coffee of which Tante Ilyana is so certain. What if such a thing did exist, an elixir against fading memoires, a panacea to evoke images of spaces lost to us, to instantly return us home. 

-Edwidge Danticat, Create Dangerously: The Immigrant Artist at Work (2010). 

(Image source: The Rumpus Interview with Edwidge Danticat)

— 1 week ago with 6 notes
Good Books/ Great Quotes

We climb to the painting with tobacco and leave handfuls by the first painting, a line with four straight, sweeping branches, and the second painting, which is of a mikinaak, or turtle. 
The mikinaak has immense significance in Ojibwe life. As there are thirteen plates in its back, it is associated with the thirteen moons in the yearly cycle, and also with women. It was women, says Tobasonakwut, who were responsible for beginning Ojibwe mathematical calculations. They began because they had to be concerned with their own cycles, had to count the days so that they would know when they would be fertile. They had to keep close track of the moon, and had to relate it to their bodies in order to predict the births of the children. And they had to be accurate, so that they could adequately prepare. In a harsh Ojibwe winter, giving birth in an unprotected spot could be lethal. Women had to prepare to be near relatives and other knowledgeable women. Mathematics wasn’t abstract. It was intimate. Dividing and multiplying and factoring were concerns of the body, and of survival. 

-Louise Erdrich, Books and Islands in Ojibwe Country (2003). 
(Image Source: Birchbark Books)

Good Books/ Great Quotes

We climb to the painting with tobacco and leave handfuls by the first painting, a line with four straight, sweeping branches, and the second painting, which is of a mikinaak, or turtle. 

The mikinaak has immense significance in Ojibwe life. As there are thirteen plates in its back, it is associated with the thirteen moons in the yearly cycle, and also with women. It was women, says Tobasonakwut, who were responsible for beginning Ojibwe mathematical calculations. They began because they had to be concerned with their own cycles, had to count the days so that they would know when they would be fertile. They had to keep close track of the moon, and had to relate it to their bodies in order to predict the births of the children. And they had to be accurate, so that they could adequately prepare. In a harsh Ojibwe winter, giving birth in an unprotected spot could be lethal. Women had to prepare to be near relatives and other knowledgeable women. Mathematics wasn’t abstract. It was intimate. Dividing and multiplying and factoring were concerns of the body, and of survival. 

-Louise Erdrich, Books and Islands in Ojibwe Country (2003). 

(Image Source: Birchbark Books)

— 1 week ago
Good Books/ Great Quotes
"I was on a subway in New York when I saw a young girl reading a book of mine, Monster. That’s quite a thrill in itself, but after turning a few pages she stopped reading, closed the book, and for a few moments was lost in thought. She had taken my words and run off with them to her own private place. In that moment all our boundaries—age, gender, race—had been bridged. If I had been dead, it wouldn’t have mattered, for on that page, in that rocking train, even mortality had been put aside. How beautiful a moment for a boy from Harlem who loved to read.”
-Walter Dean Myers, Just Write: Here’s How (2012). 
Remembering Walter Dean Myers in his own words. This is just one of his many books to discover. 
(Image source: Goodreads)

Good Books/ Great Quotes

"I was on a subway in New York when I saw a young girl reading a book of mine, Monster. That’s quite a thrill in itself, but after turning a few pages she stopped reading, closed the book, and for a few moments was lost in thought. She had taken my words and run off with them to her own private place. In that moment all our boundaries—age, gender, race—had been bridged. If I had been dead, it wouldn’t have mattered, for on that page, in that rocking train, even mortality had been put aside. How beautiful a moment for a boy from Harlem who loved to read.”

-Walter Dean Myers, Just Write: Here’s How (2012). 

Remembering Walter Dean Myers in his own words. This is just one of his many books to discover. 

(Image source: Goodreads)

— 1 week ago
#goodbooksgreatquotes  #walter dean myers  #weneeddiversebooks  #YA  #writing  #diverse YA