Real Kids. Good Books.

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Our children are gorgeously diverse and they love a good read. At the heart of Real Kids/ Good Books are authors and illustrators who are building a new diverse canon, book by dazzling book.

Themes include: children of color, LGBTQ, adoption, special needs, math, science and writing. And of course there is also a mishmash of miscellany and reblogged tidbits that strike my fancy as they float by.

Thanks for stopping by.
-Kate

try-and-touch-my-asymptote:

scienceisbeauty:

One of the answers to the topic: Visually stunning math concepts which are easy to explain at Mathematics Stack Exchange.

I think if you look at this animation and think about it long enough, you’ll understand:
Why circles and right-angle triangles and angles are all related
Why sine is opposite over hypotenuse and so on
Why cosine is simply sine but offset by pi/2 radians


This is also why radians are more superior than degrees.

try-and-touch-my-asymptote:

scienceisbeauty:

One of the answers to the topic: Visually stunning math concepts which are easy to explain at Mathematics Stack Exchange.

I think if you look at this animation and think about it long enough, you’ll understand:

  • Why circles and right-angle triangles and angles are all related
  • Why sine is opposite over hypotenuse and so on
  • Why cosine is simply sine but offset by pi/2 radians

This is also why radians are more superior than degrees.

(via s-c-i-guy)

— 2 days ago with 7679 notes
Chicago’s Urban Prep Does It Again: 100 Percent College Acceptance →

stereoculturesociety:

"Young, gifted and black, with their souls intact" - Nina Simone

Bravo!

(via cielrouge)

— 5 days ago with 51 notes
"

Teens “are hungry for good literature and it hurts me because we’re not offering them enough of what they need,” said Sharon Draper, author of award-winning books like “November Blues” and “Copper Sun.”

In 2014, the movement to publish more authors of color and write multicultural main characters remains slow and incremental.

This is not a new discussion: There has long been criticism about the lack of diversity in young adult literature, books written for readers ages 12 to 18. Experts and authors like Walter Dean Myers point back as early as 1965, when educator Nancy Larrick stirred the conversation with an article entitled “The All-White World of Children’s Books.”

"
— 6 days ago with 466 notes
"It absolutely works against our best interest to be placed in the framework of people of color. White children’s authors, for example, write about American Indians and civil rights. And my response is that it’s not about civil rights, it’s about treaty rights. And that’s an encapsulation of what goes wrong when you use a civil rights framework. To start with, people don’t know that we’re sovereign nations, that we have a political status in the United States, as opposed to a racial, cultural or ethnic one. So it’s easy to see why people fall into that multicultural framework. But it’s really not culture—it’s really politics. When people in education start developing these frameworks and chart out the ways that people of color have a history in the United States, they’ll slot us in there, too. But that collapses, erases and obscures our distinct political designation in the United States."

How Children’s Books Fuel Mascot Stereotypes - COLORLINES

Debbie Reese discussing Native American characters in children’s literature.

— 1 week ago with 3 notes
#Debbie Reese  #Native Americans  #Kids Lit  #Diversity in kids lit  #treaty rights  #Colorlines 
JOIN OUR 2014 READING CHALLENGE | Latin@s in Kid Lit →

A blog I found today. Even though 2014 is already underway I’m taking the challenge. First up… Yaqui Delgado Wants to Kick Your Ass by Meg Medina.

— 1 week ago with 1 note
kqedscience:


Surprising New Research on Gray Whales Reveals Their Complex Relationships
Scientists continue to learn more about the complex relationships between Eastern and Western Pacific stocks of gray whales and fight to save the Western population as it teeters on the brink of extinction. Learn about the surprising discovery they have made using DNA and satellite tracking with naturalist Sharol Nelson-Embry of the East Bay Regional Park District at KQED Science.

kqedscience:

Surprising New Research on Gray Whales Reveals Their Complex Relationships

Scientists continue to learn more about the complex relationships between Eastern and Western Pacific stocks of gray whales and fight to save the Western population as it teeters on the brink of extinction. Learn about the surprising discovery they have made using DNA and satellite tracking with naturalist Sharol Nelson-Embry of the East Bay Regional Park District at KQED Science.

(via scinerds)

— 2 weeks ago with 325 notes
tubooks:

ARCs of the last book in the Tankborn trilogy just arrived in the office! May can’t come soon enough for fans of the series. If you haven’t read it yet, what are you waiting for? You’ve got two books to read before May!

tubooks:

ARCs of the last book in the Tankborn trilogy just arrived in the office! May can’t come soon enough for fans of the series. If you haven’t read it yet, what are you waiting for? You’ve got two books to read before May!

— 3 weeks ago with 11 notes

leeandlow:

18mr:

Congratulations to Shigeru Ban, this year’s winner of the Pritzker Architecture Prize. Design is not just about beauty or function, it can act as social change.

Ban on creating structures out of paper tubes: “It’s a question of love. If a building is loved, it becomes permanent.”

Read more: http://n.pr/1mrB9BY - Alice

(Images: Voluntary Architects’ Network/Shigeru Ban Architects)

Shigeru Ban is one of the featured architects in our picture book Dreaming Upalong with his spectacular paper tube school. Congratulations Mr. Ban!

— 3 weeks ago with 14 notes

thecraftychemist:

Scale of the universe

Scroll to your hearts content from the Plank length to the diameter of the observable universe - click on any object and it will open an info box - I can’t imagine how much work must have gone into this. A few surprising things: Pluto has a smaller diameter than the width of the USA and Vatican city can fit in central park multiple times.

Find it here

(via yanettkawsani)

— 3 weeks ago with 2000 notes